TiVo announces new developer tools | PVRblog

The gents at PVRblog are reporting that Tivo is beginning a new developer program. I’ll have to keep an eye on this, as it appears they may support the ability of amateurs to create content on the Internet which can be delivered directly to Tivo players. A quote:

TiVo announces new developer tools | PVRblog

TiVo Video Publisher will allow video creators to provide downloadable content for TiVo. They talk about how content providers will be able to package and protect their video, but I hope that the amateurs won’t be left out of the party. It would be great to be able to pull up my mom’s vacation video as easily as a movie from the big studios. If they play their cards right they could make a killing off of long tail videos.

Exciting stuff! Can you imagine having podcast feeds which are delivered directly to your Tivo player? It sounds like it may be within the reach of the APIs specified.

I’ll read up some more and get back later with information in my next podcast.

Don’t get IP law advice from a security guard…

Those clever people at BoingBoing give a link to a story about a little girl who was asked to stop sketching famous paintings hanging in an art museum because the paintings were copyrighted. Sigh.

The story had a happier ending though:

Actually, the museum guard was mistaken. There was no copyright issue, and the museum apologizes and is telling artists to sketch away as long as they do not interrupt the flow of traffic in the always crowded gallery.

Nice that it was resolved. It was a pity that an eleven year old was kept from sketching in her notebook because of the incorrect actions of a security guard. These impromptu attempts at law enforcement (or percieved law enforcement) seem to be increasing to irritating levels.

Software makers lobby for copyright changes – Jan 7, 2005

CNN is reporting that BSA is lobbying for copyright changes. They wish to require that ISPs be required to reveal the identities of individuals who may be distributing copyrighted software on the net using P2P technologies.

The courts have so far resisted this interpretation of existing laws, instead requiring that lawsuits need to be filed separately to obtain those records from ISPs.

Here’s your thought of the day: why should law require an industry to be deputized into a law enforcement capacity and to reveal the private information regarding someone’s use of the internet before there is any evidence whatsoever that a crime has even been committed?